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Super Mario All-Stars

Stats:
System: Super NES
Release Year: 1993
Publisher: Nintendo
Developer: Nintendo
Players: 2 Alternating
ESRB: K/A

Plot

Hey all you ladies, gents, kiddies, and gamers of all ages. Zany Toadmon here coming to you all the way from your nearest NASHW Super Nintende Entertainment System used dealership, and what a dealership it is! We're practically giving them away! And today only, for the low low price of five NASHW bucks, we've got the deal of the century. Ladies, gents, and kiddies, you all know him. He's the one with the funky 'stach, the one with that questionable taste in clothing. His enemies call him nightmare, but you know him as the one, the only, MARIO!!! Everyone remembers his feats on that classic of classic machines the NES. Well what if I told you that you could relive ALL his classic capers on your new and improved Super Nintendos? But wait, there's more. What if I told you that you can also get Super Mario Bros: the Lost Levels, the Super Mario Bros. 2 that the U.S. never saw? But that's still not all! I hope you're sitting down and holding you're breaths, ladies, gents, and kiddies, because today only, for the low low price of only five NASHW bucks, you can get all these classic Mario games, revamped, reconditioned, and revised, all on ONE CARTRIDGE!!! Gamers of the world, I give you Super Mario All-Stars!

That's right. In 1993, the Super NES saw the re-release of Mario's first and greatest games, looking better than ever. The game became an instant hit, and still remains among Mario's most popular games, including Super Mario Bros. 1, 2, 3, and SMB: Lost Levels, the Japanese SMB2 considered too difficult for American gamers.

Overview

Don't let Zany Toadmon get you too excited, folks. Aside from improved graphics and sound quality, Mario All-Stars mostly remains tride and true to the original games. However, there were a few differences. For the first time ever, the SMB trilogy (err..., quadrilogy) came equipped with save files. Now, instead of 12 long hours into the night of SMB3, you could save your progress faster than you can say "pause button." Mario All-Stars also supports a 2-player battle mode, based on that of SMB3 (based on that of Mario Bros., but that's another story). Another nice feature is the addition of Super Mario Bros: the Lost Levels, Japans' SMB2. It gave gamers a semi-new Mario game to divert gamers from the long wait between Super Mario World and Yoshi's Island. You can read a short review of SMB:LL below the screenshots. Or choose the links to see reviews of Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, and Super Mario Bros. 3.

Super Mario Bros: the Lost Levels

Stats:
System: NES
Release Year: 1986 (Japan only)
Publisher: Nintendo
Developer: Nintendo
Players: 1
ESRB: N/A

Plot

I don't really know if there was a story difference or not. Think SMB, plus flying bloopers and red pirhana plants.

Overview

A few small changes over SMB. Graphic and sound-wise, the games are identical. In terms of gameplay control, they're also identical, but there are a few changes in overall gameplay. This game is indeed much harder than SMB. The 2-player mode is also absent, and instead players may select to play as Mario or Luigi in the 1-player mode. The only difference between the two is that Luigi can jump further than Mario, but is not quite as easy to control. There is also a bonus 9th world, if you complete the game without warping or saving in the All-Stars version.